Shocking Video: Water Turns Red As 250 Endangered Whales Were Killed

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  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

God created man to take care of the creatures He made. But sadly, there have been numerous cases of brutal animal slaughtering reported around the world. There’s the Yulin Dog Meat Festival wherein 10,000 dogs were slaughtered. Continue reading Shocking Video: Water Turns Red As 250 Endangered Whales Were Killed

Couple Finds The Largest Ever Intact Native American Canoe Dating Back 1,000 Years

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Two people walking along a riverbank stumbled across an ancient Native American dugout canoe thought to be up to 1,000 years old.

Robert Cornett and Jeanna Bradle noticed the 33-foot-long craft sticking out of the mud on the Red River north of Shreveport in Louisiana two weeks ago.

The canoe, which weighs some 1,000 pounds and is three-foot-wide, is thought to be the largest ever found intact in the USA.

It was constructed 800 to 1,000 years ago by digging out a cypress trump, most likely by the Caddo Indians, who settled in the area.

The find is in excellent condition, although one side of it is missing,

The canoe has been taken to Texas A&M University where a conservation process will begin that could take two years.

A wood sample has been taken away for radiocarbon dating and the craft will go on display when scientists are certain it has been protected from decomposition. The landowner donated the craft to the state, and it will be displayed locally to Red River when it is ready.

Dugout canoes were first used during the European Stone Age around 8,000 years ago. They were made by felling a tree trunk and digging out enough wood so it was sufficiently buoyant but not enough to leave it weak.

Complete trunks tend to preserve better than separate pieces of wood, so the canoes were very useful for long-term use for hunting and fishing.

The Solomon islanders of the South Pacific still use the technology to travel between the islands. Some of the canoes are very small, around six feet, and are designed for children.

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Native American activist Lehman Brightman dies at 87

Lehman L. Brightman, a longtime East Bay resident, Contra Costa College professor and Native American activist, died Sunday, May 18, 2017 at Kaiser Hospital in Walnut Creek. (Photo Courtesy of Quanah Brightman)
Lehman L. Brightman, a longtime East Bay resident, Contra Costa College
professor and Native American activist, died Sunday, May 18, 2017 at Kaiser
Hospital in Walnut Creek. (Photo Courtesy of Quanah Brightman)

Lehman L. Brightman, a proud member of the Sioux tribe, activist and longtime East Bay college history professor who rebelled against the U.S. government’s account of history, died Sunday. Continue reading Native American activist Lehman Brightman dies at 87